Llano  Texas History 

historyAB.jpg (21452 bytes)
DomeSunSt.jpg (42659 bytes)



THE ENCHANTED ROCK

AN ILLUSTRATED HISTORY
by IRA KENNEDY

Sparsely scattered across the continent are monuments, natural in origin. Some are beautiful, others bizarre; a few reach deeper than the eye or the mind to touch the human psyche. They are named holy. Enchanted Rock, which rises out of the surrounding landscape like a megalithic monument is such a place.

ROY BANFORD INKS
by MILDRED INKS DALRYMPLE AND JIM INKS
He lived his life in high gear.
Inks Lake on the Colorado River was named in honor of Roy Banford Inks, a legendary figure in Llano County.

histor5.jpg (13807 bytes)
COWHAND FROM LLANO
An Old-timers Account of Youthful Experiences in Cow Country
by ERNEST TURBIVILLE
"When I was a boy in Llano County, Texas, horses occupied the important place in the scheme of things that automobiles now do. In the cow country we were entirely dependent on horses. A man had to be mounted to take his place among men." permission from the Johnson City Free Press.

COWHAND FROM CLICK
by NORA MELTON CROSS
Henry Smith's boyhood and trail driving days.

THE BLOODY HANDS OF ALICE TODD
by LEMON SQUEEZER

"Away back in the early sixties when a Redskin lurked in every brushy hollow and when men and women went horseback to church, often times fifteen miles away, when everybody knew everybody else, and when everyone was a true neighbor -- it was then our story began."

Kings of the Texas Hills
THE ELUSEVE CHANAS OF THE LLANO UPLIFT

by JERRY C. DRAKE
It is a tradition of popular folklore in the Texas Hill Country that the name of the Llano River was derived from a little-known Indian tribe called the Chanas. Not very much is known about the Chanas as a culture. Time has chosen to forget this once proud people, leaving uswith only a few passing memories recorded in rare and ancient texts. But the Chanas were very real... a living chapter of Texas history who's story deserves to be told. Who were these elusive people, these former kings of the Texas Hills?

THE BOWIE MINE: A LITERATURE REVIEW
by BILL TOWNSLEY
The search for the legendary Lost Bowie Mine has been the topic of conversation and controversy for over a century and a half. Today, treasure hunters mine the sources in history to narrow the search.

THE LOST SAN SABA MINES
Compiled and edited by IRA KENNEDY
Reprints from articles found in the San Saba News circa 1890: 
Since the 1700's, stories of abandoned or lost Spanish mines and buried treasure in San Saba and adjacent counties have fired the imaginations of thousands of treasure seekers. The following items, from the San Saba News, convey well the excitement these stories generated around the turn of the century.

BOWIE by STEVE GOODSON
Defender of the Alamo, pioneer leader, slave trader, land speculator, Indian fighter and Prospector of lost mines. Who was this man?

MEDICINE MAN HILL
by IRA KENNEDY
Seeking legendary silver mines in La Lomeria, or the Hill Country, a Spanish expedition led by don Bernardo de Miranda, lieutenant-general of the province of Texas, set out from the presidio of San Antonio de Bejar in February, 17, 1756. Known as the Miranda expedition, the twenty-three adventurers were under orders from Governor Barrios to locate two silver mines rumored to be in the area. Miranda did find one, known as Cerro del Almagre or the Hill of Red Ochre; and in the process he came within sight of Cerro de Santiago or the Hill of the Sacred One. At least one historian has suggested Cerro de Santiago might have been Enchanted Rock, while others discount the possibility. The Hill of Red Ochre is believed by some to be the Lost Bowie Mine.

THE TEXAS CHEROKEE
by IRA KENNEDY
Woven into the fabric of personal history is the image of the American Indian. When I was a child my grandmother revealed to me, in a secretive voice, that I was of Cherokee-Irish descent; that my great-grandmother, Sarah Jane Kelly, was a full-blood Texas Cherokee. The revelation filled me with excitement and wonder. Only many years later did I realize that the secretive, almost conspiratorial tone, was shaped by generations of fear, for in Sarah Jane’s day, Indians were an undesirable element in Texas.

GERMAN INTELLECTUALS ON THE TEXAS FRONTIER:
by IRA KENNEDY

The Texas frontier of the 1850s would seem an unlikely place to find communities with a passion for literature, philosophy, music, and conversations in Latin. Just as unlikely would expectations be very high for communes in the Hill Country attempting to establish utopia along the Llano River.  But, in this area, the communities of Castell, Schoenburg, Bettina, and Leiningen were hotbeds for intellectual conversations and revolutionary social experimentation. These communities were the first to settle the Fisher-Miller Grant located between the Llano and San Saba Rivers

The Republic of Texas
1845 - THE TWILIGHT YEAR: Part 1 of 2 Parts.
by IRA KENNEDY
Rumors, gossip, lies and dreams. Conspiracies, intrigues, plots, and counter plots. This must be the Republic of Texas. From 1830 to 1845, the eyes of the world turned toward Texas. Stretching from the Rio Grande to Wyoming, and from Louisiana to Santa Fe (New Mexico), Texas was enormous, and her potential to expand all the way to the Pacific Ocean was under serious discussion.

THE BEGINNING OF THE END:
by IRA KENNEDY    Part 1 & 2 of 2 Parts
Lamar’s dream to mark ‘with the sword" the western boundary of Texas at the Pacific Ocean was as foolhardy as it was visionary. When Anson Jones ascended to the presidency of the Republic on the first Monday of September, 1844, he sought to attain by treaty what was impossible with the sword.

A VIEW FROM THE PRESIDENCY by Anson Jones: by IRA KENNEDY  
The year 1843 dawned on Texas with brightening prospects. A jealousy and rivalry began to exist between the U. States on the one hand, and Great Britain and France on the other, in relation to Texas, which was daily gaining strength, and it was not her policy to endeavor to abate or to suppress it…

THE MYSTERY OF BABYHEAD MOUNTAIN:
by DALE FRY

For over 100 years, the presence of Babyhead Mountain, a rugged hill lying some nine and a half miles north of Llano, has given foreboding testimony to one of the most gruesome—and controversial—incidents to have ever occurred in Llano County. It was here that a search party discovered the dismembered body of a missing child, her head impaled on a stick near the summit of the hill.

ON THE WAY TO ENCHANTED ROCK:
by ANNIE SIMMS WALKER

A first-hand account from Texas history. "In 1860, at the home of my father, Captain J.M. Sims, in Lavaca County, I was married to Joseph H. Walker of Llano County. He was young, handsome, and wealthy, and I was a very young and happy bride. A short time after our marriage we moved to our home in Llano, accompanied by my married sister and her husband. After a short stay they bade us farewell and returned home."

 

Texas our Texas
TO BOOKMARK THIS SITE TYPE CTRL-D NOW

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 LLANO TEXAS HOME  |   CONTENTS   |  LLANO MUSEUM  |    LLANO TEXAS HISTORY
LLANO TEXAS DINING GUIDE  | LLANO TEXAS LODGING GUIDE
LLANO TEXAS EAL ESTATE GUIDE
THE CRAWFISH OPEN  | OATMAN LAND TITLES INC   BUSINESS & TOURISM LINKS